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  • Mixing fork springs, good or bad idea?

    Someone gave me the idea so I'm giving it a go.

    In one of my 250EXC's I have 4.6 in the left and a 4.0 in the right for a desired rate of 4.3.

    I was actually looking for a set of 2nd hand 4.4's but this might get me by in the meantime.
    It pumps one way and then it pumps the other...
    you have to know what you're doing with these machines and wear gloves
    Current rides: 125 trially, 200EXC, 2x 250EXCs, XR70, DRZ70, Banshee
    https://paypal.me/dreamfieldtheory

  • #2
    There is nothing bad about it


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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    • #3
      Have to say i have thought about this more than once, i'm also wonder what if you had more preload in 1 fork ?
      2000 ktm 400 exc
      2015 Sherco 300i 6 day
      1986 Honda TLR 250 trials bike x 2

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      • #4
        Done it a few times over the years with no adverse affects.
        Current edition : Gas Gas EC300 18' .. ringa ding ding
        Current Ride .... Sherco - 300 SER 19' Factory


        17' Beta 300rr ... Gone & Sold
        Complement the Smoker ... Beta 480rr 15' .... Gone & sold
        Beta 250rr 16' ... Gone Written Off .. Xmas Drivers
        KTM 250 sx 2013 smoker ... Gone & Sold
        KTM 350xcf 2014 ... Gone & sold
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        Crf450r 04' ... Gone & Sold
        CR 85 07' .. Last of the Smokers ... The daughters weapon

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        • #5
          Not a problem. Put the 4.6 (heavier rated spring) in the leg that the brake caliper bolts onto - advice Terry Hay gave me.

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          • #6
            From my experience It makes no difference which side you put the Heavier spring in-as all braking force is pushing down evenly on your axle.


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            • #7
              I'd postulate that it maybe about the mass of the brake-assembly acting-vertically on that side?
              Still, I doubt it would make a noticeable difference; unless there is slop in bushes &/or bearings.
              The More I Learn... The Less I Know.
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              • #8
                The 4.6 is on the caliper side .... I guess I'll wind up the preload on the 4.0 if I feel I need to.

                Terry hay is a suspension guru so there's probably some scientific notion behind that idea.

                Thanks for your replies all, much confidence inspired, taking it out tomorrow for a test ride.

                Originally posted by hairyone View Post
                Still, I doubt it would make a noticeable difference; unless there is slop in bushes &/or bearings.
                I rode about 80kms on collapsed front wheel bearings on the caliper side once, the bearing race was rubbing directly against the wheel spacer ... Had to make an asserted effort not to lean (slow single track only) and couldn't use the front brake. It let go 10 minutes into the ride and I'd driven 2hrs to get there, I wasn't going home.
                It pumps one way and then it pumps the other...
                you have to know what you're doing with these machines and wear gloves
                Current rides: 125 trially, 200EXC, 2x 250EXCs, XR70, DRZ70, Banshee
                https://paypal.me/dreamfieldtheory

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                • #9
                  Kawasaki effectively did it with the SFF fork.

                  air forks will be unless the air pressure is exactly the same in each leg.

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                  • #10
                    Gotta say I'm impressed, I wound the preload back to zero on both legs and set it to comfort as per the manual. Preliminary results are great
                    It pumps one way and then it pumps the other...
                    you have to know what you're doing with these machines and wear gloves
                    Current rides: 125 trially, 200EXC, 2x 250EXCs, XR70, DRZ70, Banshee
                    https://paypal.me/dreamfieldtheory

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                    • #11
                      It's OK, only because the spring rate becomes an insignificant force deep in the stroke when the loads get serious.
                      .
                      Ignorance leads to confidence more often than knowledge does
                      .

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                      • #12
                        How serious?
                        It pumps one way and then it pumps the other...
                        you have to know what you're doing with these machines and wear gloves
                        Current rides: 125 trially, 200EXC, 2x 250EXCs, XR70, DRZ70, Banshee
                        https://paypal.me/dreamfieldtheory

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Seek out the science. Springs in parallel v springs in series. Unless the front axle is made out of licorice, you can play with combinations to suit.
                          Consider some of the mountain bikes which only have one fork.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Gypsy501 View Post
                            From my experience It makes no difference which side you put the Heavier spring in-as all braking force is pushing down evenly on your axle.
                            Not the issue. Heaviest spring goes above the area of highest unsprung weight. Reduces axle shear load. Terry knows his stuff...

                            Harley tourer rear springs on the drive side are TRIPLE the rate of the non-drive side. 😳
                            "Mindfulness has no interest in knowing the answers, it exists solely in understanding the questions"

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