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  #11  
Old 17-02-2018
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Originally Posted by Pete40 View Post
I do sympathise with you, it is frustrating when you can't get something to work that you know should work.



One thing for sure is that they can be very temperamental to bleed (properly).


The bleeding is the worst part. Think I might get one of those proper vac units.
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  #12  
Old 17-02-2018
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Originally Posted by pecker View Post
The bleeding is the worst part. Think I might get one of those proper vac units.
With the Clake, vacuum bleeding only gets the fluid into the line and caliper/slave.
The real bleeding happens when the line gets pressurised and the bubbles are made to travel up and into the master cylinder and then escape into the fluid reservoir, this process takes time and lots of lever pumping and flicking and leaving the lever(s) tied into the bars overnight and then bleed some more.
Usually you need to force the fluid up the line by compressing the brake caliper or clutch slave and then pumping the lever to regain pressure, then repeating the process again several times. The tiniest air bubble anywhere in the system will stop the clutch and/or brake from functioning to its full potential.
I fitted around 10 Clake's and the bleeding can sometimes take several hours spread out over a two day period.
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  #13  
Old 18-02-2018
c_b1 c_b1 is offline
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Working on my Clake 2 right now. Found the trick to be exactly as @Roon said. Pushing the fluid up using the calipers and the clutch slave. Then leaving over night and then repeating that .
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  #14  
Old 18-02-2018
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Originally Posted by Roon View Post
With the Clake, vacuum bleeding only gets the fluid into the line and caliper/slave.

The real bleeding happens when the line gets pressurised and the bubbles are made to travel up and into the master cylinder and then escape into the fluid reservoir, this process takes time and lots of lever pumping and flicking and leaving the lever(s) tied into the bars overnight and then bleed some more.

Usually you need to force the fluid up the line by compressing the brake caliper or clutch slave and then pumping the lever to regain pressure, then repeating the process again several times. The tiniest air bubble anywhere in the system will stop the clutch and/or brake from functioning to its full potential.

I fitted around 10 Clake's and the bleeding can sometimes take several hours spread out over a two day period.


Good to know. Itís hard not to get frustrated with it and after hours of trying you think you have done all you possibly can when clearly I probably havnt.
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  #15  
Old 18-02-2018
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Just to be clear guys, early on in my Clake history, I had a few of conversations on the phone with Owen and he would always be calm and nice and just tell me gently to flick that lever, be sure you have all the small bubbles out. It is a bit tedious, but worth it in the end.

My first One Light clutch I bled in about 3 minutes and it has been perfect ever since. Can't say that for number 2, it took longer.
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  #16  
Old 25-02-2018
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So I bled, bled and bled some more and the brake is definitely working better.

now with the clutch I found it to be very on/off and although not hard to pull in it sprung back out with a lot of force (doesn't feel natural). I read in the tuning guide if you use a rekluse to disable the clutch assist, i guess you do this by removing the clutch assist cam (which i did).

Now I find the clutch better with regards to being on/off but lever pull is a lot more than I would have liked. Any tips on how to fix this?
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  #17  
Old 26-02-2018
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Originally Posted by bowser View Post
So I bled, bled and bled some more and the brake is definitely working better.

now with the clutch I found it to be very on/off and although not hard to pull in it sprung back out with a lot of force (doesn't feel natural). I read in the tuning guide if you use a rekluse to disable the clutch assist, i guess you do this by removing the clutch assist cam (which i did).

Now I find the clutch better with regards to being on/off but lever pull is a lot more than I would have liked. Any tips on how to fix this?
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  #18  
Old 27-02-2018
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roon View Post
With the Clake, vacuum bleeding only gets the fluid into the line and caliper/slave.
The real bleeding happens when the line gets pressurised and the bubbles are made to travel up and into the master cylinder and then escape into the fluid reservoir, this process takes time and lots of lever pumping and flicking and leaving the lever(s) tied into the bars overnight and then bleed some more.
Usually you need to force the fluid up the line by compressing the brake caliper or clutch slave and then pumping the lever to regain pressure, then repeating the process again several times. The tiniest air bubble anywhere in the system will stop the clutch and/or brake from functioning to its full potential.
I fitted around 10 Clake's and the bleeding can sometimes take several hours spread out over a two day period.
Cam, make yourself a little jig from an old steel handlebar. Mine goes under the front axle bolt. Put the bike up on a box stand and the Clake on the jig. Also, drop the rear links out and snatch the rear wheel into full bump. Then vac or hand bleed the system. They bleed fine in one go.

p.s. I install the rear brake line between the chassis and gearbox and then follow the clutch line up as a pair. This looks super neat and helps the bleed process. I've only installed one trail rider Clake, all the others have been track bikes but I can't see any issues with under-routing for trail use...
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  #19  
Old 01-03-2018
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Might as well add issues here...
Ive had a Clake 2 for 3 years and swapped it over to my 17 18 months ago, Its been working well till mid last year when it started loosing its brake pressure at the lever for no reason during a ride and then pump its self back up again as the ride went on.

Sometimes it would work fine for 2 rides then give trouble on the 3rd, Its even been fine at home and been soft when unloading only to pump its self up while riding.

The amount of times i have bled this thing is ridiculous so after spying this thread its got me into investigation mode again and bled it again last night but zip tied the brake lever to the bar for a overnight rest as i haven't tried this on the 17.

Cut the cable off at lunch time today only to discover a very sight weep at the bleeder and thought i hadn't tightened it properly but it was tight as i was game to go, So rang Owen and apparently its time for new bleeding bolts and sealing washers.

My eyes are pretty ordinary without glasses i think its been weeping under high pressure application and washing the bike on the way home has covered up the tell tail signs of the leak.

Should have bits tomorrow so we will see.
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  #20  
Old 01-03-2018
c_b1 c_b1 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nutty View Post
Cam, make yourself a little jig from an old steel handlebar. Mine goes under the front axle bolt. Put the bike up on a box stand and the Clake on the jig. Also, drop the rear links out and snatch the rear wheel into full bump. Then vac or hand bleed the system. They bleed fine in one go.



p.s. I install the rear brake line between the chassis and gearbox and then follow the clutch line up as a pair. This looks super neat and helps the bleed process. I've only installed one trail rider Clake, all the others have been track bikes but I can't see any issues with under-routing for trail use...


Forgive my ignorance here (I ainít the sharpest tool in the shed) but do you mind elaborating on the floor jig technique? When you say you full bump the rear, you mean you are dropping the rear as low as possible to force the air up then snatching to bump any lasting bubbles or have I got this completely wrong? I appreciate any and all tips


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