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  #1  
Old 25-06-2007
andrewktm450's Avatar
andrewktm450 andrewktm450 is offline
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Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Illawarra
Posts: 734
Irregular brake pad wear solved!

Just had to replace the rear pads after a 2 day ride through mud & saw that the piston side pad was worn much more on the leading edge. I've seen this before on a previous bike but hadn't put much thought into it - just simply replaced the pads. I then tried to push the brake caliper in with my foot. It didn't move! That's not good I thought, as the caliper is meant to float to keep it centralised over the disc. It should be easy to push over thereby pushing in the piston & leaving a gap between the disc & the pads.
I disassembled the caliper (without disturbing the hydraulic side of things) & found that one of the pins was seized on the housing - even though it was "protected" by a rubber boot. Screwing out the other pin allowed me to free up the other pin & completely disassemble the caliper. I could then clean & grease the pins & re asssemble the caliper. It then performed "as new" with the caliper being easy to push with your foot which pushed the piston back home. Just make sure you reapply the brake several times to ensure it's right to go before you ride off.
I thought others would be able to learn from my mistakes. Your pads should be wearing evenly. If they're not, check the calipers to see if they're seized. The force of the cylinder is easily enough to deflect the disc & still provide you with braking, but the piston side pad will be doing 90% of the work, hence why it wears faster if the caliper is not free.
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Old 25-06-2007
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hamish hamish is offline
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Location: Brisbane
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good point, the more common problem with older bikes is due to wear in the bores that the pins slide into, and the caliper ends up too loose. And you guessed it, the rubber sleeves arent a spare part
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Old 25-06-2007
Shrek
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mmmm good tip, might fix mine on the weekend.
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Old 26-06-2007
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Bathy Bathy is offline
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Yep, I learnt the hard way too.

Since then every pad change has also involved a caliper pin check and re-grease
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- '96 KLX680R TM42, KX Forks, 280mm FRdisc, Ohlins Shock, BGP.
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- Wifes Bike '89 TT250, Well 'n' truly Run-In
- '96 KLX650R
- '92 CR125
- '82 KX80


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