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Old 24-02-2009
wayne ferris's Avatar
wayne ferris wayne ferris is offline
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queensland govt. ride smart

the Dalby ride magnet has arrived in the mail today
With it a pamphlet from the Qld. Gov. Dept. of Sport and Recreation
Heading,trailbikes,ride smart

it tells you about where to ride and to ride smart

go to,www.sportrec.qld.gov.au/trailbikes
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350 jawa twin,sl125,xl350,xl350(newer),tt500(orange and silver)tt500(orange and silver)another one,it250,wr400 98 model,wr250 2002 model,te250 husky good bike except all the problems
06 exc 200 shed dweller for the rest of its life
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Old 24-02-2009
wayne ferris's Avatar
wayne ferris wayne ferris is offline
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just had a look and it seems no single track as we knew any way.
representatives of the Recreational Ride Sub Committee with MQ. are Craig Hartley,Geoff Udy,Les Jensen,Rob Turton and Rob Pollock.
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350 jawa twin,sl125,xl350,xl350(newer),tt500(orange and silver)tt500(orange and silver)another one,it250,wr400 98 model,wr250 2002 model,te250 husky good bike except all the problems
06 exc 200 shed dweller for the rest of its life
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  #3  
Old 24-02-2009
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Thanks Wayne. There's some great advice in the "Tips for negotiating the terrain". I can't wait to get out there and put them into practise. And that "ride checklist" might come in handy for some riders.

Here are some tips to help you negotiate various obstacles and riding conditions you may encounter:Slick trails: Many riders think that using more throttle will get them through slick or wet trails better. Usually just the opposite is true, because high wheel spin merely turns your drive tyres into 'slicks'. It's better to moderate the throttle and use the clutch to gain maximum traction with minimum wheel spin.

Stream crossings: Blasting through streams is bad for fish and other aquatic life, not to mention your engine and image. Stirring up the sediment in the stream bottom makes it harder for fish to 'breathe' and find food. Crossing streams at high speed can also cause water to rush into your airbox, drowning out the engine. Cross only at established points, and check water depth carefully. Take it slow and steady and try to identify big rocks or other obstacles before you begin crossing. If you spill, turn off the motor before it goes under to prevent it from sucking in water.

Logs: Ideally, it's best to move a fallen log off the trail. If you can't, you'll have to go over or around it. Riding around it merely makes another trail, perhaps where it shouldn't be, so to ride over it, gently pop the front wheel over. Try to carry just enough momentum to get the rear tyre over. If you don't, you'll dig a rut in front of the log, and spend a lot of time (and energy) lifting your bike across.

Switchbacks: Switchbacks are those sharp, zig-zag trails going up steep mountainsides. They are there for a reason-to keep grades low and prevent the trail from becoming a miniature river during a storm. Switchbacks can be one of the most gratifying parts of a ride because they take a lot of skill to negotiate smoothly. Skilled riders work their way through these challenging features with minimum wheel spin. When riding switchbacks, avoid roosting (accelerating hard and kicking up dust and debris) around the apex of the turn when climbing, or brake-sliding when heading down. Both of these techniques can gouge out the trail, requiring increased maintenance.
If the turn is really tight (going up), skilled riders can try lofting the front wheel slightly while pivoting on the rear tyre. It's a tricky move, so don't try it in a dangerous spot unless you've got the hang of it. When going down extremely tight turns, you may find it easier (and safer) to get off the bike (to the inside of the turn), and bulldog it around. Bulldogging - Shut the engine off, put it in first gear, and use the clutch like a hand brake for the rear wheel.

Ruts and rocks: When riding over ruts, stay loose over the bike to allow for sudden changes. Look ahead, have smooth throttle control and watch for tree roots and rocks spanning the ruts. Ride over loose rocks with your backside slightly off the seat. Look ahead, go easy on the throttle and in one gear higher than you would normally use. This, combined with a soft pull on the clutch lever softens the power delivery to the ground, making for a smoother ride with less deflection. For big, stationary rocks, rise further off the seat, knees bent, feet high on the pegs and pick your line very carefully. Keep a finger on the clutch to help soften the blow when you hit a rock at the wrong angle. Take care not to let your feet hang down too far over the pegs and beware of rocks on the side that could damage your bike.

Wetlands: These areas deserve special protection. It is best not to go through them at all. Look for trails around the edges where the soil is more firm and dry. Ruts made in paddocks leave a lasting impression on everyone who sees them.

Sand: Sand presents a challenge - you must stay loose yet have a tight feel on the bike. Look way ahead, sit or stand centred over the bike, gently squeeze the tank with your knees, and avoid chopping the throttle (a quick reduction in engine RPM's) to keep the front end from diving. Also, because sand reduces momentum and power, you may find it helpful to accelerate a little sooner and brake a little later than you normally would. This will help keep you on top of the sand and your movements more fluid.
Practice this technique only in an area with no obstacles or hazards, and watch out for other riders.

Bike tuning: What does this have to do with the terrain?
If your bike isn't set up properly, it can make otherwise simple obstacles more difficult to overcome. Carburettor jetting, for example, (especially with 2-stroke engines) is critical. Consider tackling a gnarly switchback with a bike that's running too rich or lean in the lower rpm range. To make up for a poorly tuned motor, you may have to rev the engine at a much higher rpm just to keep it running - endangering yourself and digging a big rut around the turn. Gearing can have the same effect: if first and second gears are too tall for tight trails, you won't have much fun. Riding an improperly prepared bike is not only tiring, it can cause a lot of damage to the terrain trying to make up for poor performance.
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Old 24-02-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wayne ferris View Post
just had a look and it seems no single track as we knew any way.
representatives of the Recreational Ride Sub Committee with MQ. are Craig Hartley,Geoff Udy,Les Jensen,Rob Turton and Rob Pollock.
Webpage (and information) last updated in April 2008.

They need to update it from $150 on the spot fine for riding anywhere other than a 4-lane highway to the new "Maximum $4000 fine".
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Old 24-02-2009
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Recieved my propaganda in the mail today also.

i like the "Things to know" part of the trailbike brochure...

Off road riding isn`t allowed..

Pack of dipsticks...
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Old 02-03-2009
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Am I reading that right are they directing us to wheelie over logs ?

Hmm I smell a law suit.....
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