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  • #31
    Photo Essay - Fitting Recaro Seats To A BA/BF Falcon

    Ford Forums Link & Discussion: http://www.fordforums.com.au/showthread.php?t=11415307

    Date: 13th March, 2013

    I've always been wanting to find better seating for my taxi. I tried a set of XR6 seats a few years ago, but they have the same base and as the standard XT seat (which breaks easily). I ended up going back to the standard XT seats.

    If anyone's wondering, BA and BF XR6/XR8 seats have the same bases and rails as a standard XT. Which means that XR6/XR8 seats will bolt into an XT, as long as the recipient car doesn't have airbags in the original seats (and the replacement seats don't have airbags). The seats in my previous BF were from a BA XR6.

    I haven't worked on an FG yet, so don't know if Recaro seats will fit in. It would be a safe assumption that it would just be a matter of different adaptor brackets, although there will be a problem if the FG has seat airbags.

    The Falcon seat base is pretty weak, and it doesn't take much to break it. This is very common in the taxi world, and workshops are always welding them.

    The front two corners of the base tear easily, and eventually the front of the seat will break free and move around, especially when cornering. This is what they look like when they start to tear:





    I've had my standard seat base welded and beefed up. It now looks like this:









    But after 12 hours of throwing the car around on a weekend night, I'm a tad tired. The standard seats also don't offer much side support, and so I was curious how a Recaro seat would go.

    You can find Recaro seats on eBay and Gumtree easily enough for around $1,000 a pair. Stuff that - way too expensive. Do some homework and work out what cars came with Recaro seats standard - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recaro#...d_Recaro_seats

    It turns out that the Proton Satria GTi had Recaro seats. Do some looking around and find one for wrecking. I've seen wreckers selling the seats for $500/pair. I paid $350 for mine, although they needed a decent clean.

    Recaro seats are also symmetrical - you can fit one on either side of the car. Just remove the side adjuster knob and swap it to the other side.
    2012 KTM250EXC-F (stolen in 2019)
    2008 Aprilia SXV550
    2013 Husqvarna Nuda
    1998 Yamaha DT200R
    Various unfinished projects

    One owner. Only driven gently on Sundays. Sold to best offer. First to see will buy. Reward offered for safe return. Coming soon to a cinema near you. Available for a limited time only.

    My waterbed broke this morning. Oh, I don't have a waterbed. Bugger.

    Comment


    • #32
      One of the seats that I bought:

















      2012 KTM250EXC-F (stolen in 2019)
      2008 Aprilia SXV550
      2013 Husqvarna Nuda
      1998 Yamaha DT200R
      Various unfinished projects

      One owner. Only driven gently on Sundays. Sold to best offer. First to see will buy. Reward offered for safe return. Coming soon to a cinema near you. Available for a limited time only.

      My waterbed broke this morning. Oh, I don't have a waterbed. Bugger.

      Comment


      • #33
        Almost all Recaro seats have the same base. The exceptions are some of the OEM ones fitted to cars as standard. I found a bunch of Suzuki Ignis Sport seats that are Recaro, but those ones don't have the standard base. But if you are going to make up your own brackets then that is an option.

        I wanted to make sure that I had myself covered legally, so I ordered adaptor brackets from my local Recaro reseller. At $220, they were way overpriced. It also turns out that they reduce the distance that the seats can go back, so I'll be taking them to a metal fabrication place and getting them remade (once I clarify the legal requirements). When I do that (ie when I get around to it) then I'll publish the dimensions here.

        The adaptor brackets - The bit at the top of the photos is to hold the adjustment switch in place:









        Putting it all together was easy enough. I wanted to keep my original seat ready to use if required, so bought a set of driver's seat rails ($50) and an adjustment switch ($25) from a wrecker. This meant that I could put together a complete seat, and putting the original one back in is now a simple bolt out/bolt in job if required.

        The brackets bolt to the seat with six M6 x 30 bolts (with a spring washer on each one). You can see at the end of the brackets the bolts that normally bolt directly to the rails poking through from the seat.



        The rails have now been bolted back on.



        A close up of one of the bolts that comes out from the seat base and through the adaptor bracket and rail mounting.



        Because I wanted to have a complete separate seat, I bought this panel for $25 so that I could get the adjuster switch from it.



        The other side of the side panel, showing the switch.



        The button unclips and pulls off easily enough. The switch can then be removed from the plastic panel.

        2012 KTM250EXC-F (stolen in 2019)
        2008 Aprilia SXV550
        2013 Husqvarna Nuda
        1998 Yamaha DT200R
        Various unfinished projects

        One owner. Only driven gently on Sundays. Sold to best offer. First to see will buy. Reward offered for safe return. Coming soon to a cinema near you. Available for a limited time only.

        My waterbed broke this morning. Oh, I don't have a waterbed. Bugger.

        Comment


        • #34
          The switch will then be attached to the plate that is welded to the side of one of the adaptor brackets.



          This bit of alluminium then holds the switch in place. Two bolts come through from the top of the metal plate. It's important to position the switch correctly so that the small rods are in the middle of the holes in the plate.



          The adjustment switch in place. Not exactly classy, but it works.



          The assembled seat, ready to be fitted into the car.



          To remove or fit a Falcon seat, there are four of these bolts with a Torx T50 head. Removing them with a ratchet is fiddly, so I use a ratchet to loosen them and then a cordless drill to completely remove them.



          When removing and fitting a driver's seat, there are these three cables that connect to the seat rail. Note: BEFORE removing a seat, set it to its maximum height so that it is easier to remove and attach these cables. Each one has a different way of clipping in. With the grey one, the clip is actually underneath, so once you have the bolts removed you lean the seat back and reach under it. I use a fingernail to pull a bit of plastic downward.



          One advantage of the Recaro seats is that they recline forward. Makes it a bit easier to get them in and out of the car, and will also be useful if you want to fit these into a ute. Don't forget to remove the headrest before moving a seat in or out of a car, otherwise will get stuck against the top of the door frame.



          Another view of the seat reclined forward.



          The finished job.

          2012 KTM250EXC-F (stolen in 2019)
          2008 Aprilia SXV550
          2013 Husqvarna Nuda
          1998 Yamaha DT200R
          Various unfinished projects

          One owner. Only driven gently on Sundays. Sold to best offer. First to see will buy. Reward offered for safe return. Coming soon to a cinema near you. Available for a limited time only.

          My waterbed broke this morning. Oh, I don't have a waterbed. Bugger.

          Comment


          • #35
            I don't like how the adaptor brackets hold the adjustment switch horizontally instead of the usual vertically, but I've gotten used to it. When I get the brackets remade, part of it will be to have the switch in a vertical position.

            Was it worth doing' Yep! I like the lower back and side support that the Recaro has. And the Recaro base doesn't tear like the Falcon one does. I'm much less fatigued at the end of a 12 hour shift in the car.

            The only problem that I've had is when I've tried to get my wallet out of my pocket when in the car. I've lifted my waist by pushing my shoulders back into the top of the seat. This has put excessive pressure on the seat base and torn out one of the bolt mounts. I've done this three times now (idiot).





            I've got four Recaro seats - the Proton two that I originally bought, plus two individual ones that I've bought cheaply ($100 each - too cheap to ignore). I'll get the broken ones repaired, sell the Proton pair and keep the other one as a spare. This also wouldn't have happened if the adaptor brackets let the seat go back as far as it should do, so getting the brackets remade will prevent this (and it wouldn't have happened if I didn't need the seat to go so far back).

            If you want front seats that are more comfortable then replacing either both seats or the driver's seat only is definitely worth doing.

            If anyone in Perth is interesting in doing this and has metal fabrication skills then let me know. I'll bring the seat, we can make some replacement brackets and then publish the dimensions on here for everyone else.

            Something that I haven't covered here: There are plastic covers that go over the bolts that hold the seats in place. Because I seem to be removing the front seats semi regularly I've left them out of the car. They clip into place.

            For Recaro parts, replacement foam, etc, there is the Capital Seating web site - http://www.capitalseating.co.uk

            Some threads about replacing the seat bolster foams:
            http://mk2vr6.com/board/viewtopic.php?f=56&t=8264
            http://forums.vwvortex.com/showthrea...-available!%29
            http://77e21.info/recarofoam.htm
            2012 KTM250EXC-F (stolen in 2019)
            2008 Aprilia SXV550
            2013 Husqvarna Nuda
            1998 Yamaha DT200R
            Various unfinished projects

            One owner. Only driven gently on Sundays. Sold to best offer. First to see will buy. Reward offered for safe return. Coming soon to a cinema near you. Available for a limited time only.

            My waterbed broke this morning. Oh, I don't have a waterbed. Bugger.

            Comment


            • #36
              Photo Essay - Driver's Door Assembly

              Ford Forums Link & Discussion: http://www.fordforums.com.au/showthread.php?t=11406611

              Date: 17th October, 2013

              Some time ago some bimbo was reversing a 4WD as she changed her mind about pulling into a particular carpark. I happened to be on the road behind the carpark entry, and despite me holding my hand on the horn (and making plenty of noise) she kept on reversing until she collided with my car. The damage was limited to the driver’s door, but the door needs replacing.

              I found a door from a wreck that is the same colour as mine. Goody, that means that it’s a simple bolt off/bolt on job and won’t need panel beating or painting.

              Tonight I had a go at fitting the replacement door. It wasn’t until I had the old door off that I decided to get the camera out and take some photos, so the photos in this series are a bit out of order. But these photos will at least show you what the driver’s door is comprised of.

              Here is the replacement door, ready to bolt on. I’ll be using my existing mirror and door trim. The driver’s window was smashed in a break-in late last year and the replacement window that I got has bad tint. This has irritated me ever since, so it was a bonus to get with this door a window that is in perfect condition.



              Removing the old door wasn’t too hard, although it did weigh quite a bit. I used two axle stands and some rag cloth to support the door for when the bolts were removed. I used a 10mm ratchet spanner to remove the four bolts, and a ratchet and 10mm socket to remove the bolt that connects the black strut to the car body. In amongst all this I also had to disconnect the power cable that powers the electric window, mirror and door lock.

              Despite my full concentration, the door fell over anyway as I was trying to disconnect the cable. I spat the dummy, until I realised that this was the old door and that the scratch and dent that it sustained didn’t matter. If you’re doing a door swap then I highly recommend that you have a second person to help stabilise the door as you undo the bolts and disconnect the power cable (which you can’t do until the door hinge bolts are either very loose or removed).



              Another view of the door frame after the door has been removed.



              What I did, and how I did it. I reached in with a 10mm ratchet spanner to remove the four bolts that attach the hinges to the door. Then I used a ratchet and 10mm socket to remove the bolt that connects the strut that stops the door from opening up too far.

              I’ve also removed the door trim from the old door, and will be fitting it to this replacement door.



              As I was replacing the door, I needed to transfer the door lock from the old door to the new one. There are two metal rods to deal with - one for the door handle and the other one for the door lock.

              For the door handle rod, reach behind the white plastic clip and push it toward you. With a bit of force it will unclip and you can then rotate it upward and out of the way. The rod will then slide out sideways to the right.

              For the lock rod I reached in with a fairly small flat blade screwdriver and levered the white plastic apart until the rod was able to slide sideways out to the right.



              When removing the lock from the original door, I ended up removing the door handle and lock together. I later realised that the lock can easily be removed with the door handle still in place.

              You also don’t really need to disconnect the door handle rod, but I did so to give me access to the upper bolt that holds the door lock in place.



              These are the tools that I used for removing the door handle and lock. Not much to it - a flat blade screwdriver, 1/4” drive spinner handle, a 1/4” ratchet and 10mm socket. The spinner handle has a 1/4” input at the handle end, so it doubles as an extension bar. And yes, I forgot to include the T25 screwdriver that I have - you can buy one from any tool shop.



              Once the door lock has been removed. The door handle can then be removed via the other side (ie the outside of the door). The handle rod has been folded down to below where the photo stops.



              The door handle and lock, all disassembled.



              Removing the door lock from the door handle is easy - it just rotates and then slides out.

              2012 KTM250EXC-F (stolen in 2019)
              2008 Aprilia SXV550
              2013 Husqvarna Nuda
              1998 Yamaha DT200R
              Various unfinished projects

              One owner. Only driven gently on Sundays. Sold to best offer. First to see will buy. Reward offered for safe return. Coming soon to a cinema near you. Available for a limited time only.

              My waterbed broke this morning. Oh, I don't have a waterbed. Bugger.

              Comment


              • #37
                To fit the lock to the door handle, push it in and rotate it anti-clockwise.



                A photo showing the two bolts that hold the door lock in place. The bolt that connects the door handle to the door (on the far left) isn’t there, but is the same as the upper door lock bolt.



                There is a recess in the door handle plastic that accommodates the metal tab on the door lock.



                This photo shows where the two bolts go that attach the door handle to the door.



                To disconnect the rod that connects to the door lock, use a flat blade screwdriver to lever apart the white plastic until the rod will slide sideways out to the right.



                This shows where the two rods go, and how to disconnect the door handle rod.



                Now that I had the door handle and door lock sorted out, it was time to remove the driver’s side mirror from the old door and fit it to the replacement door. There are three T25 Torx head screws that attach the mirror to the door.



                There is a plastic tab that conveniently holds the mirror in place for when you remove or re-fit the Torx screws. To remove the mirror, pull the bottom of it away from the door.



                Another photo showing the plastic tab and where it goes into on the door.



                The plastic that goes on the inside of the door just unclips and pulls outward.

                2012 KTM250EXC-F (stolen in 2019)
                2008 Aprilia SXV550
                2013 Husqvarna Nuda
                1998 Yamaha DT200R
                Various unfinished projects

                One owner. Only driven gently on Sundays. Sold to best offer. First to see will buy. Reward offered for safe return. Coming soon to a cinema near you. Available for a limited time only.

                My waterbed broke this morning. Oh, I don't have a waterbed. Bugger.

                Comment


                • #38
                  This photo shows what you’ll see once you’ve removed the door trim and need to start removing the mirror.



                  The door trim is attached to the door by a bunch of white plastic studs. It all clips into place. To remove the trim from the door, just pull it away from the door once you are sure that you have removed all the relevant T25 screws. If it doesn’t come away then go looking for whatever T25 screws you have forgotten.



                  When putting the driver’s door handle back in, make sure that you clip the white plastic back into the door handle surround.



                  To remove the door handle, there will be a small bit of plastic to cover the screw. Remove that and you’ll see a T25 Torx screw. Remove that screw and the door handle will come loose.



                  If you need to strip the door and do anything with the door handle or lock then you need to make sure that the window is wound up before starting, so that you have access to the door handle and lock. I forgot to do this with the old door, so had the window in the way of getting to the door handle and lock. To connect the door to power would have meant refitting the entire door to the car. I ended up removing the window from the door by using a flat blade screwdriver to push the plastic tabs apart. You can also try using a pair of needle nose pliers to push the tabs apart.



                  As mentioned earlier, the old door fell over when I was balancing it to unplug the cable. I was lucky that no damage was done to the cable socket on the car. I was cursing furiously until I realised that this is the old door, so damaging it wasn’t a problem. This incident confirmed that fitting the replacement door was going to be a two person job, so the girlfriend was summoned. In hindsight, the original door falling over was useful as it prevented me from possibly stuffing up and damaging the replacement door.



                  The completed job. Much to my delight everything worked perfectly. The door opens and closes properly, and the power window, central locking and electric mirror all work as they should. I’ll get a replacement taxi logo sticker put on next week, but after having a severely dented driver’s door for the last couple of months I’m just relieved to have everything straight again.



                  I was pretty pleased to find a door that is a perfect match. The donor car is the same year - it was one month older. I wrote this before I fitted the replacement door:

                  I bought a door.

                  From a store.

                  The old door is done for.

                  Because of some bimbo who decided to reverse some more.

                  At the time, I was angry to the core.

                  I wanted to thump her to the floor.

                  Or get her a one-way ticket to Timor.

                  At the very least, declare war.

                  Such action is certainly called for.

                  Stuff World War 3, I want World War 4.

                  My car suffered some gore.

                  Damage to it will make me poor.

                  Until her insurance pays then my wallet will be sore.

                  Fitting it on my own will be quite a chore.

                  I haven’t done this particular task before.

                  I’d much rather just go to bed and snore.

                  I just noticed that this rhyming is becoming a bore.

                  It certainly won’t become folklore.

                  Of that, I am very sure.

                  Unless you are keeping score.

                  I shall not babble anymore.

                  I am a rhyme whore.

                  Hear me roar.

                  ------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                  Once I finished the job I came back inside and wrote this:

                  The time came to fit it.

                  But the door fell over and took a hit.

                  I threw a fit.

                  Dammit, you stupid piece of shit.

                  Lots of other words I did emit.

                  The dummy - I well and truly spit.

                  Most upset I was, I do admit.

                  With lots of bad words, the atmosphere was lit.

                  Repeating those words here would be most unfit.

                  I checked the door - I have dented it.

                  I wanted to throw the bloody thing into a deep pit.

                  Or into orbit.

                  My wrists - they must be slit.

                  Oh, hang on a little bit.

                  If you will be so kind to permit.

                  It’s the old door - time to cool it.

                  The new door has not yet been through the refit.

                  Over in the corner it still sit.

                  I hereby acquit.

                  And regain some of my former wit.

                  For I have not damaged the new piece of kit.

                  It is still all legit.

                  Worthy of my car, it shall befit.

                  Writing crap on this forum - I shall not omit.

                  To this I shall always commit.

                  Such as this lovely rhyming little skit.

                  Which I hereby submit.

                  Via the internet it shall transmit.

                  I don’t know what to make of it.

                  Time for me to quit.

                  I shall split.
                  2012 KTM250EXC-F (stolen in 2019)
                  2008 Aprilia SXV550
                  2013 Husqvarna Nuda
                  1998 Yamaha DT200R
                  Various unfinished projects

                  One owner. Only driven gently on Sundays. Sold to best offer. First to see will buy. Reward offered for safe return. Coming soon to a cinema near you. Available for a limited time only.

                  My waterbed broke this morning. Oh, I don't have a waterbed. Bugger.

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Update:

                    Well, no-one spotted my… intentional… mistake here, so I’ll now show how this job should have been done.

                    Turns out that the hinges come apart - you don’t have to unbolt anything to remove a door.

                    The driver’s door window regulator died at the start of the Easter weekend. That had to be fixed as soon as possible (ie so that the taxi can be locked and secured when required) but I knew that replacing the window regulator was probably going to take a while (ie I haven’t done it before).

                    I had a spare car the same colour at home, so I figured that we’d just swap the driver’s doors until I could replace the window regulator at the end of the weekend. And after doing it the hard way last year, I wanted to try doing it the easier way.

                    To clarify with the cable, there is a plastic tab which is pushed inward, and then the connection comes apart at that point. I used a flat blade screwdriver to lever the two connections apart.



                    In each hinge there is one of these little black plastic gadgets. Remove each one with a set of multi-grip pliers.



                    The hinges then just come apart. Pretty simple.



                    A close up photo of one of the plastic inserts.



                    I wasn’t fussed about some minor scratching on the hinges, so used a crowbar to lever them apart. If you want to be extra careful then you can cover the crowbar with some rag cloth.



                    A close up of the hinge part that is on the car (unfortunately out of focus, between swapping doors around and fitting a new window regulator I was rushing through all this as quickly as I could).



                    The hinge part that remains on the door.



                    The car end of the cable fell back into the body, so I used a pair of needle-nose pliers to pull it back out. I found that it was easier to have the door in position but reconnect the cable before reconnecting the hinges.



                    What isn’t shown in these photos is the trolly jack and rag cloth that I had holding the door up at the right height. This also meant that I could slide the door along the rag, closer to the car. Using the trolly jack to help line up the door hinges made this task a lot easier.
                    2012 KTM250EXC-F (stolen in 2019)
                    2008 Aprilia SXV550
                    2013 Husqvarna Nuda
                    1998 Yamaha DT200R
                    Various unfinished projects

                    One owner. Only driven gently on Sundays. Sold to best offer. First to see will buy. Reward offered for safe return. Coming soon to a cinema near you. Available for a limited time only.

                    My waterbed broke this morning. Oh, I don't have a waterbed. Bugger.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Photo Essay: Replacing the Oxygen Sensor and PCV Valve

                      Ford Forums Link & Discussion: http://www.fordforums.com.au/showthread.php?t=11378219

                      Date: 1st October, 2012

                      Both my girlfriend's and my taxi have been intermittently running rough lately. Deb's car is stalling sometimes, and mine is having phases of a few minutes each time where it is very underpowered.

                      I had put a new stepper motor in each car a few months ago, which was about when the problems started. So, thinking it might be a bad batch of stepper motors, I replaced them with new ones again. No change.

                      I had the throttle body on each car cleaned by a taxi mechanic who does this stuff every day. Again, no change.

                      The problem wasn't electrical - it was clearly some sort of fuel starvation issue. Whenever my engine ran on low power output, it still did so smoothly - there wasn't the roughness that running on four or five cylinders would produce. So, it wasn't plugs or coils.

                      That's where I was starting to get stumped and started to do some searching through Falcon forums, and started reading threads about oxygen sensors and PCV valves. The more posts I read, the more it seemed like either one of these two was causing the problem for each car.

                      I finally decided to replace the oxygen sensor and PCV valve on each car. The first task was to figure out what each of them was, which wasn't too hard. Ford's price for an oxygen sensor is around the $400 mark, so more searching was done to see what alternatives there are.

                      Sure enough, Bosch make one. Bosch stuff is sold very cheaply all over Australia by a company called MTQ Engine Systems. The part number that people had posted on forums matched the part number listed in the Bosch PDF that I found. Goody.

                      This job was going to be done today. I decided that this morning, and nothing was going to stop that. Any natural disasters, terrorist attacks or armageddons would have to bugger off and wait until at least tomorrow. Today I was going to replace the *&^%$# oxygen sensor and PCV valve on the two taxis. I had been receiving substantial whinging from both the girlfriend and my day driver, and there was a sudden development today of an urgent requirement to shut them both up.

                      So, having figured out what oxygen sensor to buy, I made the call to MTQ. The price in their catalogue was $39.50 plus GST, which was most acceptable. But, they didn't have any in stock in Perth, and would have to get them from the eastern states. This was not compatible with my declaration that this job was going to be done today.

                      A call to Repco confirmed that they had them available. For $111. No worries, don't call me, I'll call you.

                      A call to another auto parts company confirmed that I could get them for a trade price of $61.55 each. But, he wanted a parts order, on a letterhead, etc. He wouldn't do them for trade price for a taxi. I gave up and rang another branch. Rod was more than happy to sell them to me for trade price, but he only had one in stock. Crap. However, he immediately solved the problem by creating an order on the computer system to be picked up at the place that had the two in stock, at trade price. Ripper, it took a few phone calls and some stuffing around, but I finally had two oxygen sensors lined up. Girlfriend was called and informed of the situation - it was her job to go and pick up the sensors (ie NOW!), whilst I moved on to organising PCV valves (including figuring out what one is first).

                      PCV valves were easy - they came to about $11.00 each from the usual Ford dealer that I get taxi parts from, and they had plenty in stock.

                      I got the oxygen sensor out of my car and rang girlfriend to inform her to hurry the hell up. She did this, and my car had a new oxygen sensor a few minutes later. She went off to do other stuff whilst I decided to get the Aprilia out and go pick up the PCV valves.

                      Doing my car was easy because the engine bay was cold. Doing Deb's car was going to be a pain because she would have to drive the thing to my place (ie hot engine bay).

                      It all worked out rather well. After fitting the new oxygen sensor and PCV valve to my car, there was the magic moment where the engine actually did start and run properly.

                      Deb arrived some time later and we left her car in my front yard with the bonnet up for a while. Surprisingly, it cooled down fairly quick and the same job got done on her car.

                      She left about 10 minutes ago and just rang. Bugger, a phone call so quick meant that she'd already had more grief. No, she was calling to tell me how much better the gearbox kickdown now worked.

                      Now that I know how cheap and simple it is to do replace these two parts, I wish that I did it weeks ago. Ah well, another lesson for future reference.

                      The photos:

                      Here's the old one that came out of my car, next to the new Bosch one that is about to go in Deb's car. Minor differences at the sensor end, but they look like they would both do the same job.



                      Here's a photo of the clip on the one that came out of my car. This was difficult to disconnect - it was mounted to the firewall and there were hoses blocking my view of it, so I just had to feel around and guess how to unclip it. It turned out that was doing it the right way, but the plastic wouldn't come loose until some "encouraging" words were said. I used a small flat blade screwdriver with one hand to push the clip in and yanked it in different directions with the other hand.



                      The Ford service manual PDF that I looked through before starting this said to use Loctite 767 or similar (ie anti-seize), so I got Deb to get the smallest amount they've got. Apparently smallest and life time supply mean the same thing.



                      A photo of the engine bay in Deb's car, showing the oxygen sensor location and the LPG hoses that I also had to deal with.



                      You remove this heat shield. There are three bolts on the top that require a 13mm socket. There are two bolts at the bottom that require a 10mm socket.



                      The removed heat shield - you can see where the lower bolts go.



                      I've disconnected two hoses from the LPG converter so that I can get to the oxygen sensor. I don't know what size spanner it takes - I just used a large crescent to loosen it.



                      Here's the new one ready to go in, with the anti-seize on the threads.



                      The new one in place. To tighten it, I used used low to medium force with a crescent. Pretty close to spark plug tension.



                      Now it was time to replace the PCV valve, which turns out to be a stupidly simple thing on top of the engine. I got the plastic valve and the rubber elbow, which needs to be forced onto the PCV valve.

                      2012 KTM250EXC-F (stolen in 2019)
                      2008 Aprilia SXV550
                      2013 Husqvarna Nuda
                      1998 Yamaha DT200R
                      Various unfinished projects

                      One owner. Only driven gently on Sundays. Sold to best offer. First to see will buy. Reward offered for safe return. Coming soon to a cinema near you. Available for a limited time only.

                      My waterbed broke this morning. Oh, I don't have a waterbed. Bugger.

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        The new PCV valve in place. I always use a zip tie to tighten the hose's grip, preventing it from coming off.



                        The finished job. New oxygen sensor and PCV valve are in place, the heat shield is back on and the hoses are connected where they are meant to be.



                        Here's the two old oxygen sensors side by side. On the left is mine; on the right is Deb's. My car is currently up to 457,000km and I'm pretty sure that's the original one. Deb's car is up to 280,000km and I'm pretty sure that's also the original one. This is also confirmed by the fact that they look identical, apart from the colouring on the sensor ends.



                        Photos of the parts numbers. The part number for the Bosch oxygen sensor is 0 258 986 603. As mentioned earlier, the cheapest place that I can think of to get them is MTQ Engine Systems (www.mtqes.com.au). While you're there, don't forget to get some Bosch AeroTwin wiper blades ($15.50 vs $30-35 retail), some PBR Super Dot 4 brake fluid (ie what I use for my brake fluid flushes), a set of spark plugs, an oil filter or three, a petrol filter, air filter, drive belt and maybe a spare headlight globe or two. They also have Bosch brake pads, alternators and starter motors, as well as PBR brake parts (eg disc rotors). Get a catalogue and have a look through it while you're there - if it's Bosch or PBR then they have it at much lower pricing than everywhere else.



                        How I confirmed the part number for the Bosch oxygen sensor: It wasn't that hard - some searching on Falcon forums found it easily enough. But, to make absolutely 100% sure, I went to http://www.bosch.com.au/content/language1/html/2230.htm and clicked on Engine Management Systems. On that page (ie http://www.bosch.com.au/content/language1/html/4543.htm) there is a link for Oxygen Sensors. Clicking on that downloads a PDF. For the 2009-2010 version that I got, the listing for a BFII Falcon is at the bottom of page 57.
                        2012 KTM250EXC-F (stolen in 2019)
                        2008 Aprilia SXV550
                        2013 Husqvarna Nuda
                        1998 Yamaha DT200R
                        Various unfinished projects

                        One owner. Only driven gently on Sundays. Sold to best offer. First to see will buy. Reward offered for safe return. Coming soon to a cinema near you. Available for a limited time only.

                        My waterbed broke this morning. Oh, I don't have a waterbed. Bugger.

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Photo Essay - Replacing BA/BF Falcon Ball Joints

                          Ford Forums Link & Discussion: http://www.fordforums.com.au/showthread.php?t=11415571

                          Date: 18th March, 2014

                          Part 1 - Why Replace Them?

                          I'm going to make this the one-stop-shop thread for replacing ball joints, so I'll start by reposting some previous stuff so that everything is in the one thread. This is going to take a while, so go clear the bladder and bowel, tell the missus that you'll gone for a few days, get your favourite pizza shop menu and strap yourself into your favourite chair.

                          I had a close call with a worn ball joint a couple of days ago, so am going to ramble on about these things for a bit. If you aren't familiar with ball joints and have a Falcon then you need to be aware of this stuff.

                          Ball joints are part of the front end suspension area. They are part of the stuff that holds the front wheel on. Which means when a ball joint wears out and fails then things are going to get a tad tricky.

                          There is an upper and lower ball joint on each side of an AU/BA/BF Falcon. It's probably the same for previous Falcons - look it up.

                          One of the lower ball joints on my girlfriend's taxi let go last year, but luckily she was stationary. It just went click and the front end collapsed. This also caused some minor damage to the front fender panel.





                          Deb was extremely lucky - these things normally let go when the car is moving.

                          That's when the real fun happens, as I found out with an AU Falcon back in early 2009. I was cruising along at 85km/h with myself and four other guys in the car. The ball joint let go at that speed, the passenger side of the car collapsed and the whole lot slid along the road. It freaked the hell out of me at the time but I kept both hands held tightly onto the steering wheel - I figured as long as the car stayed on the bitumen and didn't drift into the kerbing on either side of the road then we'd be ok.

                          By the time the car dropped to 60km/h I figured that we weren't all going to hospital that night. Luckily, the car kept going in a straight line and no-one was harmed. It did leave a very impressive long skid mark on the road which was there for weeks afterward.

                          This was at about 3:30am on a Wednesday night. The car was back on the road on Friday, a day and a half later.

                          These days, I know a lot more about ball joints and how this failed. In this case, it was a lack of maintenance (I didn't own that car). Now that I've got my own taxi, and my girlfriend has hers, I'm a lot more interested in knowing how to replace these on my own and ensure that this doesn't happen again.

                          Here are some photos that I took with an old Nokia phone and a torch at the time - I've never published these before because I've never been able to do a decent Photoshop job on removing certain logos and signage. These will have to do for now:













                          2012 KTM250EXC-F (stolen in 2019)
                          2008 Aprilia SXV550
                          2013 Husqvarna Nuda
                          1998 Yamaha DT200R
                          Various unfinished projects

                          One owner. Only driven gently on Sundays. Sold to best offer. First to see will buy. Reward offered for safe return. Coming soon to a cinema near you. Available for a limited time only.

                          My waterbed broke this morning. Oh, I don't have a waterbed. Bugger.

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Part 2 - The G &G Technics GGT-400 Hand Press

                            Don't know about you, but those photos motivate me to know a bit more about ball joints.

                            My taxi has been making some squeaking sounds over the last two weeks, but it wasn't until Friday afternoon that I could get it to a workshop.

                            As soon as he pulled out on to the road for a test drive the mechanic said that it was one of the ball joints. He pointed out that the steering was also stiffer than usual. I also thought this, but had just been away on holiday for a few weeks driving other cars so wasn't sure whether it was just me used to the other cars that I'd driven lately.

                            The car went up on the hoist and the passenger side wheel had some movement in it. You can test this by pushing the wheel up and down (ie get under it and push up and down with your shoulder) - if there's any movement then that's the worn ball joint. This is easy enough to do on a hoist but more difficult to do at home with a jack.

                            The mechanic had the ball joint replaced with minutes.

                            So, if you are getting some squeaking sounds from the front end and/or the steering seems a bit stiffer than normal, then you need to get the ball joints checked immediately.

                            I was curious what tools he used. I had read about the G & G Technics GGT-400 previously and sure enough, that's what he had in the workshop. I decided right then to buy one as soon as possible. Ball joints aren't expensive (around $30 each) so I would happily fit new ones on both taxis every six months if I could. That would be excessive, but I'm a tad obsessed with preventing the above mishaps.

                            The G & G Technics GGT-400 can be found easily enough for around $400. I made some phone calls and found a Repco that had one in stock that someone ordered but didn't pick up. The manager knew that it was dead stock and being so specialised it wouldn't sell for a long time (if ever). She couldn't make a loss on it, but she wasn't fussed about making a huge profit on it either. We bounced some numbers back and forth and managed to agree on $350.

                            Some tips on haggling:
                            - First of all, identify the person who is authorised to negotiate. That's the person to discuss it with.
                            - Be polite about it. Lots of manners. Everyone thinks that haggling is a power trip that requires aggression and raised voices. Retail staff hate that crap and are more inclined to just end the conversation to get rid of you.
                            - I figure out in advance a number that I want to pay - in this case I had the rather ambitious and slightly unrealistic figure of $300 in mind.
                            - Explain that's the budget that you've allowed for this. How close to that price can you get?
                            - With the right amount of tact and charisma (ie decisive, but still a bit of sucking up) it's surprising what you can get out of people.
                            - In this case, she hinted what the cost price was. $330 wasn't going to do it either. Stuff it, I've made the decision to buy one of these things so we agreed on the $350.
                            - When I haggle on things, I do it to buy the item. Not to waste any time or try the person out. I conduct the negotiation, make the agreement and then go buy the thing immediately.

                            Web site link - G &G Technics GGT-400: http://www.ggtechnics.com.au/product...le_hand_press/
                            Instructions: http://www.ggtechnics.com.au/product...structions.pdf



                            A diagram showing what comes in the box.



                            Photos of mine:















                            Someone is currently selling them on eBay for $399 delivered: http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/150951261864
                            Or, look up their eBay store at: http://stores.ebay.com.au/partszoos
                            2012 KTM250EXC-F (stolen in 2019)
                            2008 Aprilia SXV550
                            2013 Husqvarna Nuda
                            1998 Yamaha DT200R
                            Various unfinished projects

                            One owner. Only driven gently on Sundays. Sold to best offer. First to see will buy. Reward offered for safe return. Coming soon to a cinema near you. Available for a limited time only.

                            My waterbed broke this morning. Oh, I don't have a waterbed. Bugger.

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Part 3 - How To Replace The Ball Joints

                              If you haven't ordered pizza yet, then now is the time to do so.

                              I'll start with a couple of diagrams that show what the front end is composed of.





                              Here's a photo of the brass rings and spacers. For replacing the lower ball joints, I'm going to use numbers 4, 5 and 7.



                              I bought this extra long ring spanner/ratchet spanner a few months ago and am finding it to be extremely useful for anything to do with brakes and engine oil changes (ie those jobs use a 15mm spanner or socket, and require a suitable a bit of tension to undo and redo up.)

                              This is a Sealey AK631915 Double Ring Ratchet/fixed Spanner Extra-long 15mm, which I got via mail order from England. Cost around $30 delivered. The ring spanner end is a good depth, so won't strip a bolt head. This thing is allowing me to undo brake calliper bolts easily, and do them up tightly enough later on. Do a Google or eBay search for Sealey AK631915 to find one (I bought mine on eBay).



                              This is what I keep in my toolbox for loosening wheel nuts. It's an extendable wheel brace - you can get these from car accessory shops. I found a gadget that adds a ratchet effect, also from a car accessory shop. And then the socket on the end - I'm currently using 19mm wheel nuts, but almost all other Falcons will be using the usual 21mm wheel nuts. I also keep one of these wheel braces in the car for changing a flat tyre.



                              I've jacked up the front of the car and removed the wheel. When jacking up the car, I've jacked up the entire front so that with both wheels off the ground I can turn the hub and spindle back and forth as required. This made it much easier to access certain areas.



                              I've removed the disc rotor and calliper. I use a pot plant hook from a hardware shop to hang the calliper from either the upper control arm or the suspension spring. I've loosed the nut at the top. It turned out that my impact socket set (ie six-sided) didn't have an 18mm socket, but a 19mm six-sided socket worked fine.



                              Having removed the bolt. I've given the upper control arm a few thumps with a normal hammer. The vibrations will help the two items to come apart. A bigger hammer would be useful, but this one loosed it easily enough. The upper ball joint and spindle came loose fairly easily.



                              Having got the top one loose, it was time to start on the bottom. I used an 8mm ratchet spanner to remove the ABS sensor so that I have better access to the ball joint nut.



                              I used the extendable wheel brace to give me the leverage to remove the ball joint nut, which came loose quite easily (they aren't done up particularly tight).

                              2012 KTM250EXC-F (stolen in 2019)
                              2008 Aprilia SXV550
                              2013 Husqvarna Nuda
                              1998 Yamaha DT200R
                              Various unfinished projects

                              One owner. Only driven gently on Sundays. Sold to best offer. First to see will buy. Reward offered for safe return. Coming soon to a cinema near you. Available for a limited time only.

                              My waterbed broke this morning. Oh, I don't have a waterbed. Bugger.

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Once the nut was loosened, I went to work with the hammer and started banging around the lower spindle area.



                                Much to my relief, the spindle and ball joint came apart fairly easily.



                                The spindle came away from the car and sat on the ground. Time to start on removing the ball joint.



                                Start by removing the rubber cover, which lifts off with a bit of force. The ball joint is full of grease.



                                The new replacement ball joint - part number BA3395A. They retail for somewhere around $50 each, but you can do a search for that part number on eBay. I found one listing that had them for $59.95 a pair, including postage.



                                Time to use the press to push the old ball joint out. Ring 7 has a collar on it that fits over the top of the ball joint. Ring 5 is an empty spacer that allows room for the ball joint to slide downward. I had overlooked getting a socket to fit the hand press, so ended up having a go with an old fashioned crescent. Using a socket with the extendable brace would have been much easier, but the crescent did the job. When fitting the new bush, I pushed the crescent the last few times with my foot to make sure that the ball joint was pushed fully into place. And of course, it wasn't until I finished the entire job that I realised that I have a 27mm socket in my motorbike toolbox. Bugger.



                                Another view of the hand press, rings and spacers that were used to remove the ball joint.



                                Ring 7 is the one that pushes the top of the ball joint down. On one side of 7 is a collar that fits into the top of the hand press, and on the other side is a collar that fits snugly over the top of the ball joint.



                                Another photo showing how ring 7 goes between the hand press and ball joint.



                                Now that I've got the old ball joint out, you can see the splines in the remaining hole.

                                2012 KTM250EXC-F (stolen in 2019)
                                2008 Aprilia SXV550
                                2013 Husqvarna Nuda
                                1998 Yamaha DT200R
                                Various unfinished projects

                                One owner. Only driven gently on Sundays. Sold to best offer. First to see will buy. Reward offered for safe return. Coming soon to a cinema near you. Available for a limited time only.

                                My waterbed broke this morning. Oh, I don't have a waterbed. Bugger.

                                Comment

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